Difference between revisions of "Debbie Dingell"

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==Medicare For All Congressional Caucus founders==
 
==Medicare For All Congressional Caucus founders==
 
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[[File:Dingelll.PNG|thumb|300px]]
 
In August 2018 [[Medicare For All Congressional Caucus]] founders were Representatives [[Pramila Jayapal]], [[Keith Ellison]], [[Debbie Dingell]].
 
In August 2018 [[Medicare For All Congressional Caucus]] founders were Representatives [[Pramila Jayapal]], [[Keith Ellison]], [[Debbie Dingell]].
  
 
[[Category:Medicare For All Congressional Caucus]]
 
[[Category:Medicare For All Congressional Caucus]]
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[[Debbie Dingell]] chaired the caucus.
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==Medicare for All Act==
 
==Medicare for All Act==
 
In February 2019 Rep. [[Pramila Jayapal]] introduced H.R.1384 - Medicare for All Act of 2019. By May 29 she had 110 co-sponsors including Rep. '''{{PAGENAME}}'''.
 
In February 2019 Rep. [[Pramila Jayapal]] introduced H.R.1384 - Medicare for All Act of 2019. By May 29 she had 110 co-sponsors including Rep. '''{{PAGENAME}}'''.

Latest revision as of 15:53, 10 July 2019

Debbie Dingell


Debbie Dingell serves on the House Budget Committee and the House Natural Resources Committee. She is the Ranking Member on the House Natural Resources Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight and Government Reform.

Background

Descended from one of the Fisher brothers, owners of Fisher Body, a GM founder, she has served as president of the General Motors Foundation and as executive director of Global Community Relations and Government Relations at GM.

She married Michigan Congressman John Dingell, 28 years her senior, in 1981; she is Dingell's second wife. She had grown up as a Republican, but became a Democrat soon after marrying Dingell.

She is a member of the Democratic National Committee from Michigan and chaired Vice President Al Gore’s campaign in Michigan in 2000. In 2004, she also helped secure the Michigan Democratic primary and general election vote for John Kerry in Michigan.

In November 2006, Dingell was elected to the Board of Governors of Wayne State University in Detroit

Jobs for America Task Force

September 13, 2017 Press Release Washington, D.C. – Today, Congressman Darren Soto announced that he will serve in a leadership role in the House Democratic Caucus Jobs for America Task Force, a unified effort from the House Democratic Caucus to craft a real legislative agenda that will benefit hardworking Americans and middle-class families. The congressman will serve as co-chair for the New Economy Task Force, along with Representatives Suzan DelBene (D-WA), Debbie Dingell (D-MI), and Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL).[1]

Arab American Political Action Committee

The second annual Arab American Political Action Committee dinner was held in 1999 and was attended by over 800 people. Osama Siblani welcomed the audience and introduced Samer Jaafar the Chairman of the Endorsement Committee. AAPAC's president Abed Hammoud delivered the organization's message and plans for the future. Congressman David Bonior, the House Minority Whip and U.S Senator Spencer Abraham delivered their addresses. Dr. Mohamad Khansa chaired the Dinner Committee.

Prominent Michigan public officials in attendance included US Senator Spence Abraham and his wife Jane Abraham, US Congressman David Bonior and his wife Judy Bonior, US Congressman John Dingell and his wife Debbie Dingell, US Congressman Sander Levin and his wife Vicki Levin, US Congressman John Conyers, Jr., US Congresswoman Debbie Stabenow, US Congressman Joe Knollenberg, US Congresswoman Lynn Rivers, Wayne County Sheriff Robert Ficano and Eunice Confer representing U.S. Senator Carl Levin.[2]

Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services

In 2010 Debbie Dingell served on the board of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services.

Democratic Party Super Delegates

In February 2008 Michigan Democratic Party Super Delegates were;[[3]

Charles Brown Mon, 25 Feb 2008

Congressional Progressive Caucus

In June 2015, Debbie Dingell was listed as a new member, of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.[4]

Anti-TPP letters

The proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal "could only lead to the offshoring of U.S. jobs, especially in the service sector, and the erosion of America wages, nine newly-elected Democrats said in a letter to the president. Overall, 13 of 17 newly-elected Democrats are opposing Fast Track".

Rep. Ruben Gallego (D-AZ) led the efforts of a group of the letter writers and his version was signed by Brendan Boyle of Pennsylvania's 13th District; Mark DeSaulnier of California's 11th District; Debbie Dingell of Michigan's 12th District; Brenda Lawrence of Michigan's 14th District; Ted Lieu of California's 33rd District; Kathleen Rice of New York's 4th District; Mark Takai of Hawaii's 1st District; and Bonnie Watson Coleman of New Jersey's 12th District.

"[W]e believe this legislation lacked sufficient guarantees to ensure Congress' voice in shaping the substance of international trade agreements negotiated by the Administration," another group of freshman Democratic legislators wrote. "Our concern is that previous versions of TPA legislation did not ensure sufficient input of our constituents' concerns about labor, environmental, and human rights protections that must be essential in the trade deals you are currently negotiating."

Reps. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts' 6th District, Pete Aguilar of California's 31st District and Norma Torres of California's 35th District a the second letter.[5]

ADC event

Dingy.PNG

In October 2015, Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee-Michigan Director and Congresswoman Debbie Dingell Director Fatina Abdrabboh and Congresswoman Debbie Dingell spoke at the Arab-American National Museum in support of Books for Benefit, a nonprofit charity dedicated to improving literacy in schools as a means of empowering youth. The event, which was largely organized by local youth leaders, raised over $10,000 for the charity.

Condemning Criticism of Islam legislation

On December 17, 2015, Rep. Don Beyer, Jr. introduced legislation condemning "violence, bigotry, and hateful rhetoric towards Muslims in the United States." The legislation is based on unsourced claims that there is a "rise of hateful and anti-Muslim speech, violence, and cultural ignorance," and a "disproportionate targeting" of "Muslim women who wear hijabs, headscarves, or other religious articles of clothing...because of their religious clothing, articles, or observances." The resolution, H.Res.569 - Condemning violence, bigotry, and hateful rhetoric towards Muslims in the United States [6]

The legislation was cosponsored by Rep. Michael Honda, Rep. Keith Ellison, Rep. Joseph Crowley, Rep. Andre Carson, Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Rep. Betty McCollum, Rep. Marcy Kaptur, Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Rep. Dan Kildee, Rep. Loretta Sanchez, Rep. Charles Rangel, Rep. Scott Peters, Rep. Brad Ashford, Rep. Alan Grayson, Rep. Mark Takai, Rep. Brian Higgins, Rep. William Keating, Rep. Raul Grijalva, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Rep. G.K. Butterfield, Rep. Gerry Connolly, Rep. Ruben Gallego, Rep. Cheri Bustos, Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Kathy Castor, Rep. Luis Gutierrez, Rep. Michael Quigley, Rep. Elizabeth Esty, Rep. Joseph Kennedy III, Rep. Robin Kelly, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, Rep. Gregory Meeks, Rep. Grace Meng, Rep. Al Green, Rep. Katherine Clark, Rep. Adam Schiff, Rep. Alcee Hastings, Rep. Sam Farr, Rep. Frank Pallone, Rep. Jim McDermott, Rep. Barbara Lee, Rep. Donna Edwards, Rep. Robert Brady, Rep. Frederica Wilson, Rep. Michael Doyle, Rep. Albio Sires, Rep. Suzan DelBene, Rep. Judy Chu, Rep. Jared Polis, Rep. David Loebsack, Rep. Bill Pascrell, Rep. Debbie Dingell, Rep. Jan Schakowsky, Rep. Steve Cohen, Rep. Ruben Hinojosa, Rep. John Yarmuth, Rep. Niki Tsongas, Rep. Jim Langevin, Rep. Mark Pocan, Rep. John Conyers, Jr., Rep. Mark Takano, Rep. Tim Ryan, Rep. Jose Serrano, Rep. Hank Johnson, Rep. Paul Tonko, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, Rep. Lois Capps, Rep. David Price, Rep. Doris Matsui, Rep. Gwen Moore, Rep. Denny Heck, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Rep. John Carney, Rep. Xavier Becerra, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Rep. John B. Larson, Rep. Dina Titus, Rep. Peter Welch, Rep. Lloyd Doggett, Rep. Jim Himes, Rep. Matt Cartwright.

Closed meetings

Fay Beydoun is the Executive Director of the American Arab Chamber of Commerce in Dearborn, Michigan. In early March, she saw Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speak at Detroit Manufacturing Systems where the candidate gave an almost 40 minute speech that focused on income inequality and misbehavior by corporate elites. Beydoun was impressed with how Clinton spoke about creating jobs and strengthening the economy. “The Arab American community is definitely divided in their support for Hillary or Bernie, but she is definitely the most qualified candidate for the Democrats. The Arab American community is definitely in agreement that her foreign policy is bad, but we still need to have a seat at the table if she is given the nomination.” Beydoun also praised the work by Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Senator Debbie Stabenow for inviting Arab Americans to attend closed-door receptions to hear from Secretary Clinton away from the cameras.[7]

Advocating for Justice

Arab American Policy Concerns Advocating for Justice: From Syria & Palestine to Profiling & Surveillance

Wednesday April 29, 2015 Rayburn House Office Building

Panelists on Domestic Concerns

Panelists on Foreign Policy Concerns

Representatives also in attendance:

Anti-Trump guest

Rep. John Conyers didn’t attend President Donald Trump’s inauguration January 2017, but the Detroit Democrat plans to be at Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night.

To make a point, he will be accompanied by Nabih Ayad, the lead attorney for the Arab American Civil Rights League who filed suit in Detroit challenging the constitutionality of Trump’s first proposed travel ban.

Conyers and several other Democrats are bringing guests to the speech who have spoken out about or would be personally affected by Trump’s immigration policies or by GOP plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint Township, will be joined by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the pediatrician who 18 months ago uncovered elevated levels of lead in the blood of Flint children.

Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Southfield, is bringing Fatima Salman, executive director of Muslim Student Association and a board member of the Michigan Muslim Community Council.

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, will take Phoebe Hopps of Traverse City, an activist who helped organize the Michigan contingent of the women’s march in Washington and the protest against Trump’s travel ban at Detroit Metropolitan Airport.[9]

Women's convention

Women’s March announced that U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) will open the Women’s Convention’s Friday evening program, which will take place in Detroit from Friday, October 27 to Sunday, October 29 2017.

Rep. Brenda Lawrence (D-MI), Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-MI), Wendy Carrillo, and [Erica Ford] will also join the roster of over 60 women speakers, femmes, and allies of all backgrounds who will join thousands for a weekend of workshops, strategy sessions, inspiring forums and intersectional movement building. The theme of the Convention, “Reclaiming Our Time,” will honor U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), who will be headlining the Convention on Saturday evening.

“It was amazing to be part of the Women’s Marches and witness democracy in action...I fully expect to see that same turnout, passion and energy here in Detroit, and I look forward to speaking with women leaders from across the country,” said Senator Debbie Stabenow.

The growing list of speakers include: Angela Rye, Amber Tamblyn, Symone Sanders, Piper Perabo, Sally Kohn, Nomiki Konst, Leah Greenberg, Lilliana Reyes, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Rebecca Cokley, Nina Turner, Stephanie Schriock, Ai-jen Poo, Aida Hurtado, Lenore Anderson, Stephanie Chang, Raquel Castaneda Lopez, Melissa Mark-Viverito, Sarah Eagle Heart, Rashida Tlaib, Brittany Packnett, Winnie Wong, Stosh Cotler, and the Women’s March co-chairs Bob Bland, Carmen Perez, Linda Sarsour and Tamika Mallory.[10]

Socialist intern

Patrick Dunstone served in the Office of Congresswoman Debbie Dingell.[11]

Nayyirah Shariff connection

Nayyirah Shariff December 14, 2018 ·

Debbiedingo.PNG

Me, a Congresswoman and a Congressional-elect walk into a reception... — with Rashida Tlaib and Debbie Dingell.

Medicare For All Congressional Caucus founders

Dingelll.PNG

In August 2018 Medicare For All Congressional Caucus founders were Representatives Pramila Jayapal, Keith Ellison, Debbie Dingell.Debbie Dingell chaired the caucus.

Medicare for All Act

In February 2019 Rep. Pramila Jayapal introduced H.R.1384 - Medicare for All Act of 2019. By May 29 she had 110 co-sponsors including Rep. Debbie Dingell.

Emgage Action rally

Politicians and activists rallied Muslim Americans in Dearborn on July 29 2018 to encourage voter participation in the upcoming Aug. 7 primary election and to register new voters for the November ballot.

Held outside the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center, there was a festive atmosphere, with bouncy houses for children, and food vendors to tempt tastes, but there was a serious message to impart: In an election pivotal to Muslim Americans candidates and voters, every vote will count, in the primary and general election, and eligible citizens should register and learn about the process and ballot.

The event was organized and sponsored by Emgage Action, an American Muslim community advocacy organization; Mpower Change, a grassroots movement working to build social, spiritual, racial and economic justice for all people; the Michigan Muslim Community Council, which works to unify communities and promote social justice; and the National Network for Arab American Communities, an Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services Institution.

Nada Al-Hanooti, executive director of the Michigan chapter of Emgage Action, said the Muslim community tends to have a low voter turnout.

“What we’re trying to do is energize our community, get them out to the polls, because we have a lot of great candidates right now,” Al-Hanooti said. “Not only because they are Muslim, but because they are extremely qualified and viable candidates. So this is our time, and we are taking full advantage and mobilizing.”

Gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed and political activist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who spoke at the rally, were the reason many attended, but for Majeda Tafish, 40, of Dearborn, who became a naturalized citizen 10 years ago, it was a chance to take the first step to register to vote.

In the past, Tafish said, the lists of candidates and the issues seemed daunting to her.

“I want to vote, to have a voice,” she said. “Wherever I go, they keep saying, ‘Vote, vote,’ but I see a big list and I don’t know any of them. They give me a brochure that says nice things about them, but I don’t know who to believe.”

Among the politicians on hand for the event were Sam Beydoun, candidate for Wayne County Commissioner; Donald Stuckey II, candidate for Michigan’s 9th state House district; state Rep. Sylvia Santana, current House Representative for the 9th district, who is running for state Senator for District 3; Gary Woronchak, Wayne County Commission chairman, who is running for state Senate in the 3rd district; Fatou-Seydi Sarr, candidate for state House in the 8th district; Abraham Aiyash, candidate for the state Senate 2nd district; U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D – 12th District),; Fayrouz Saad, candidate for U.S. House 11th district; Rashida Tlaib, candidate for the U.S. House 13th district; state Rep. Abdullah Hammoud, 15th district; Democratic primary gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed; and Michigan Supreme Court Candidates Samuel Bagenstos and Megan Cavanagh.

Sarr, Aiyash, Dingell, Saad, Tlaib, Hammoud, El-Sayed, Bagenstos and Cavanagh were among the politicians who spoke at the event. They were joined by speakers Dawud Walid, executive director of the Michigan Chapter of the Council of American-Islamic Relations; Ahmad Abuznaid, director of the National Network for Arab American Communities, an Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services institution; activist Khadega Mohammed; activist Linda Sarsour; and political activist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York City.

Abdul El-Sayed called for the Muslim voting community to raise its voices, vote and encourage others to vote in the primary and general election.

“When you look at who we are right now, we are so much better,” he said. “That is the opportunity in front of us on Aug. 7. Let’s not lose that opportunity because we, together, are doing the work of democracy. Now let’s go get it.”[12]

Trade rally

A coalition of pro-worker House Democrats, led by veteran Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., opened talks on June 25 2019 with President Donald Trump’s trade negotiator about writing strong and specific worker rights straight into Trump’s “new NAFTA,” rather than just into U.S. legislation to implement the controversial “free trade” pact.

“We have made it clear from Day One there must be changes in the agreement” itself, DeLauro said in an interview after a Capitol Hill press conference that day with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, other union reps, and other pro-worker lawmakers.

Trumka called the confab to present more than 200,000 names on petitions to Congress demanding Congress not even consider, much less approve, legislation implementing the “new NAFTA”—formally called the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement—unless there are strong and enforceable worker rights sections.

With such strictures, Mexican wages would increase, unions and workers say. “If Mexican wages are not allowed to increase, they”—corporations—“will continue to suck jobs out of the U.S.,” Trumka warned.

One reason the lawmakers and unions want the pro-worker requirements written into the trade pact’s text itself is they don’t trust Trump, or U.S. multinationals, to follow any law implementing the new agreement.

“Go back to 1992-93, when NAFTA passed,” said Rep. Donald Norcross, D-N.J., an Electrical Worker and former head of the South Jersey Building Trades Council. NAFTA proponents “promised we’d get more and better-paying jobs, but if you were a worker, you got royally screwed.”

“So the idea of ‘Trust me again and somehow it’ll be different’ isn’t going to do it.”

“My workers asked for” a new trade pact, “but they also said ‘Don’t give us the shaft,’” said Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., whose district includes Detroit 3 auto plants, such as Ford’s River Rouge. “We need an enforceable deal that pays American workers fairly and Mexican workers fairly.”

The worker rights sections of the USMCA are important. NAFTA, the 25-year-old pact it would replace, cost the U.S. between 770,000 and one million industrial jobs and thousands more white-collar jobs, such as in call centers. Machinists Legislative Director Hasan Solomon said his union alone lost 40,000 aerospace jobs as bosses moved 300 factories to Mexico.

As a result, the AFL-CIO and its member unions have been lobbying hard for enforceable worker rights, and Trumka led a three-day trade pact town hall listening tour to Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Detroit earlier in June.

Those enforceable worker rights include extensive labor law reform in Mexico, the establishment of a Mexican Labor Department, and a new court system to handle worker rights, free Mexican unions (not pro-company ones), and hiring of thousands of labor rights inspectors there.

They also include an end, in four years, to the 700,000 contracts those sham unions signed with multinational corporations, Trumka said. He previously doubted Mexico could achieve those goals, even more so since he reported multinationals are now challenging USMCA’s Mexican ratification in 96 court cases.

All those worker rights proposals and more were thought to be in the enabling legislation Trump has yet to send to Congress to implement the USMCA. DeLauro and Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., made it clear those rights must be in the pact itself, especially since lawmakers theoretically cannot change the USMCA or the legislation Trump sends with it.

“There must be amendments to the text” of the “free trade” pact, DeLauro said in an interview after the press conference. “That has been our understanding from the outset and the U.S. Trade Representative has been told that,” DeLauro said of Trump’s top trade negotiator, Robert Lighthizer.

“We have said we want changes in the agreement,” not just in the bill Trump sends to Capitol Hill, Schakowsky added.

“Activists are demanding there be no vote on NAFTA 2.0”—the USMCA—“until it’s fixed,” said Lori Wallach, a trade expert who heads Public Citizen’s Trade Watch. “The petitions demand strong labor and environmental standards” in all three countries, but particularly in Mexico, “and that enforcement be swift and certain.”

And both Wallach and Hassan warned of political trouble should Lighthizer, and Trump, not budge. “Expect an ugly fight” in Congress over the USMCA if Trump stays stubborn, said Wallach.

“I want to be crystal clear,” Solomon added.” This message is for any candidate for president or running for Congress: If you support NAFTA 2.0 as currently written, please do NOT call the Machinists union for an endorsement, political support or a contribution. You need to call Mexico for support! Because that’s exactly where NAFTA 2.0 will send our good American jobs.”[13]

References