Tracey Corder

From KeyWiki
Jump to: navigation, search


Tracey Corder is a San Francisco activist. She serves as the Racial Justice Campaign Director for Center for Popular Democracy, building deep and close relationships with core affiliates who are focused on driving racial justice work as well as working with other CPD staff to develop effective intersectional campaigns.

She came to CPD from Oakland Rising where she worked as the Field Director for 2 years. There she was responsible for developing short and long term electoral strategy and helping to sustain intentional relationships with partner organizations, elected officials, city staff, labor, community leaders and other key stakeholders in Oakland. Prior to this, Tracey worked as the Deputy Field Director for CO Victory in the 2014 federal midterms elections and served as the Wisconsin African American Vote Director for the 2012 Obama re-election campaign. She has strong ties to the labor movement through her organizing as the Service Area Organizer with AFL-CIO in Wisconsin. Tracey has also worked to elect candidates on every level of government throughout the country.

Born in Milwaukee, WI and making her home in Oakland, CA, Tracey is a member of the BYP100-Bay Area Chapter and a co-host of the weekly podcast That's What She Said. Tracey holds a BS in Sociology and Human Services from Edgewood College and spent 4 years as a Social Worker before formally entering organizing work. [1]

Panel on 2020 democratic primaries

Zzzzzzzzzzzhhhhhh.PNG

Organizing Upgrade February 21 2020.

Join Organizing Upgrade for a live panel discussion on the 2020 democratic primaries, hosted by Rishi Awatramani and Adam Gold, featuring left organizers Laurel Wales, Cliff Albright, Jaisal Noor, Shawn Sebastian, Tracey Corder and more!

"A letter from the movement to the movement'

In September 2019 Tracey Corder was one of 100 black leaders, many affiliated with Liberation Road who signed A letter from the movement to the movement defending Maurice Moe Mitchell and Nelini Stamp of the Working Families Party for endorsing Elizabeth Warren instead of Bernie Sanders for the Democratic Party presidential nomination.

Statement of endorsement for Elizabeth Warren

Black Womxn for is an organizing collective of leaders, activists, artists, writers, and political strategists from across the country in the fight for black liberation. This statement reflects the views and intentions of the undersigned.

The last presidential election laid bare what many black women, gender non-conforming, and non-binary, and queer folk know deeply; that this nation embraces white supremacy and its evils, even at the expense of itself. It’s no wonder that even among the most committed activists there is a strong skepticism, aversion and even avoidance of participating in political systems.

Our endorsement comes not after lip service or political pandering, but from the hundreds of conversations with black women gnc/nb folks across the country, substantive discussions about policy and the power of grassroots organizing, and the opportunities and limitations of election politics. After gathering in fourteen cities across the united states and collecting hundreds of survey responses from self-identified progressive black women and gnc/nb folks, the overwhelming majority of excitement and support is for Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

We endorse Senator Warren with the full weight of accountability. Our endorsement is not a blanket approval of all of her acts, both past, present, and future but rather a firm and calculated understanding that should she fall short of her commitments to us and our communities she will be held to account.

The support for Senator Warren’s candidacy within our community is matched by an awareness that accountability requires commitment in words and actions. To that end, Senator Warren has agreed to the following asks from the Black Womxn for community:

Act with moral leadership: Sen. Warren has taken a stance against the white supremacy and misogyny that are woven into the fabric of this country. Policy change is not enough. Sen. Warren has committed to devoting money, staffing resources, and the bully pulpit towards rooting out the culture of white supremacy, exploitation-for-profit, and misogynoir in our schools, legislative language, federal hiring practices, medical institutions, arts and culture, and all areas of our society.

Changing the face of the federal government: there are hundreds of positions in the federal government that the senator will have the opportunity to appoint. In 2018, 93% of people running our government were white and 80% were white men. Senator warren has committed to fundamentally changing the internal and external face of the federal government by appointing more black women, especially trans and immigrant women, black men, indigenous people, people of color and disabled people. She has agreed to apply a race and gender equity impact analysis when hiring for her transition team and administration.

We are progressive black activists who are not beguiled by political theater. We are not ignorant to the violent legacy of politics. Each day, we thread a delicate needle of interacting with systems that have oppressed us while building collective power to shape the terrain so that our liberation is not but a dream, but an awakening.

We write this letter, not with the belief that sen. Elizabeth Warren is a savior, but a stalwart who can be challenged when necessary, moved when appropriate, and held accountable to a base led by black community leaders. We endorse her with the complete recognition that, upon her victory, the work is not over, nor is it just the beginning.

A warren victory ensures an environment in which black community leaders can better and more easily usher in those long-overdue societal transformations that move us closer to the liberation that we know is possible. If you agree, we invite you to sign this statement via the form link at the bottom of this page.

We know our power. We understand the opportunity and the stakes in this election. We hope to encourage others, especially black women and gnc folks, to be engaged in this important political moment.

Black Womxn for steering committee

Anti-Trump

Mabelo.PNG

Mabel Tsang wrote :Tomorrow I will be heading to DC with a #ItTakesRoots to Grow Resistance Delegation convened by Grassroots Global Justice Alliance / Climate Justice Alliance / Indigenous Environmental Network / Right To The City Alliance because I believe we can create an alternative to Trump's Terror. He stands for racist violence; aggression against women; criminalizing queer, gender non-conforming and transfolks; and detention of and war against immigrants and refugees - in the name of our future and our values.

I believe the alternative exists today. I believe it already exists in my organizing work at Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN) and I believe it exists in our dreams for our collective future. This moment scares me and this moment emboldens me. This moment shows me the need and the proof for powerful actions and bold experimentation. It calls on all of us to act.

With Jane Martin, Vivian Yi Huang, Rachel Lee Holstein, Laiseng Saechao, Malcolm Amado Uono, Hyejin Shim, Sydney Fang, Amee Raval, JingJing He, Alex Tom, Annelisa Luong, Chiravann Uch, Alvina Wong, Miya Yoshitani, Ed Scott, Shina Riane, Eric Mar, Russell Wynne, Nick Mitchell, Saa'un P. Bell, Mee Jung Tsang,, Jin-kyung Kim, Megan Zapanta, Orlie Kapitulnik, Aiko Pandorf, Mei-ying Williams, Nancy Kab Xyooj, Erika Lenhart, Jonathan Ronald Tran, Jen-Mei Wu, Emily Ja-ming Lee, Nadia Khastagir, Shaw San Liu, Stacy Kono, Steve Lew, Sophia Arredondo, Cynthia Fong, Tracey Corder, Salima Hamirani, Jennifer Lee, Lu Lin, Ellen Choy, Shannon Garth-Rhodes, Kasi Farrar, Joshua Fisher Lee, Feng Kung, N’Tanya Lee, Kenneth Tang, Geordee Mae, Maya Tanaka, Timmy Lu

References