Gerald Meyer

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Gerald Meyer is a Brooklyn, New York activist, and "friend" of the Communist Party USA.[1]

Communist "Manifestivity"

On October 30 and 31, 1998 the Brecht Forum presented the "Communist Manifestivity to celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Communist Manifesto" at Cooper Union's Great Hall, New York.

Individual endorsers of the event included Gerald Meyer.[2]

"Socialism Betrayed"

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In 2004 Roger Keeran, and Thomas Kenny published "Socialism Betrayed: Behind the Collapse of the Soviet Union"

Special thanks went to Bahman Azad, Norman Markowitz, Michael Parenti, Anthony Coughlan, and Betty Smith for reading the entire manuscript and suggesting editorial and substantive changes. We would also like to thank those who read all or parts of the manuscript and those who shared their ideas and sometimes their encouragement: Gerald Horne, Frank Goldsmith, Erwin Marquit, Sam Webb, Elena Mora, Mark Rosenzweig, Gerald Meyer, Joe Sims, Lee Dlugin, Pat Barile, Daniel Rubin, Phillip Bonosky, Bill Davis, Evelina Alarcon, Tim Wheeler, Scott Marshall, Noel Rabinowitz, Paul Mishler, Jarvis Tyner, Esther Moroze, Marilyn Bechtel, Gerald Erickson, Constance Pohl, Jackie DiSalvo, Richard Najarian and Brawee Najarian, and Jim Miller.

Also thankedd were librarians, Mark Rosenzweig of the Reference Center for Marxist Studies and Jackie Lavalle, for helping with the research, and Eileen Jamison for tracking down numerous books and articles. Also owed a debt of gratitude were Gregory Grossman for helping find sources on the second economy. Also thankedd were SUNY Empire State College for granting a sabbatical leave to Roger Keeran during which he did some early research and writing. Catherine Keeran for her assistance and Alice Ward and John Ward for providing accommodations and company, while Roger did research at the University of Texas. David Granville, Derek Kotz, Ian Denning and Charles Keller, and for technical help.[3]

Science & Society

In 2009, the Editorial Board of Science & Society, a New York based "journal of Marxist Thought and Analysis", consisted of:[4];

Remembering Vito Marcantonio

On Sunday afternoon, December 17 2017, a crowd of about 50 people gathered for a ceremony marking the renaming of the NE corner of 116th Street and Lexington Avenue in New York as “Vito Marcantonio Lucky Corner.” Vito Marcantonio, who represented East Harlem in Congress for seven terms from 1935 to 1951, would, like his mentor and close friend Fiorello La Guardia before him, wrap up his political campaigns with a rally on this corner.

This street-naming not only has been a long-term goal for the Vito Marcantonio Forum (VMF) but also was a goal of the outgoing NYC Council speaker, Melissa Mark-Viverito, who was instrumental in making it happen.

The event was emceed by Mark-Viverito herself who, in her opening remarks, emphasized the importance of naming this particular corner in honor of Marcantonio. She said he was “a champion for all the people,” who not only was a fighter against Jim Crow, but also a champion of Puerto Rican independence.

Referring directly to Marcantonio as one of her role models, the speaker said, “I have remembered those who have come before me and guided me as I moved forward representing East Harlem and the South Bronx: Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Evelina Lopez Antonetty, and Vito Marcantonio —all champions of the working class.” Also in her remarks Mark-Viverito gave a nod to her deputy chief of staff, Diana Ayala, who will be taking her seat on the city council.

Also addressing the crowd was a special guest, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, who came to the event even though she was not on the program.

Mark-Viverito and Brewer were directly followed by a reading of Gil Fagiani’s poem, the “Litany of San Vito,” which he wrote in tribute to Marcantonio. The poem was read in English, Italian, and Spanish by Chris Bell, Maria Lisella, and Gloria Quinones, respectively.

Frank Marcantonio, the son of Vito’s brother, spoke for the family, remarking that although he never met Vito Marcantonio, he was influenced by him.

Attorney and community activist Gloria Quinones, who played an important role in speaker Mark-Viverito’s political career, spoke of Marcantonio as a source of guidance and inspiration for today’s leaders.

Gerald Meyer, co-chair of the VMF, spoke briefly about the historical significance of the renaming of the corner. He noted that the dedication of Lucky Corner reminds the progressive community that it needs traditions and memorials associated with a “people’s history.” He also said the Vito Marcantonio Forum looks forward to memorializing other sites associated with the life and work of this great spokesperson of all those who had been left out of the American Dream.

At the end of the dedication, actor and VMF co-chair Roberto Ragone, did a dramatic interpretation of excerpts from several of Marcantonio’s speeches, including an extract from a speech he gave on that very corner in 1950, during his campaign for mayor.[5]

References