Alexandria Foster

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Alexandria Foster


Alexandria Foster is a Michigan activist.

Education

University of Michigan Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Political Science 2011 – 2015.[1]

Affiliations

College Democrats, Organizing for Action, Community Action and Social Change Student Advisory Board.[2]

Affirmative action

In April 2004 Alexandria Foster was packing her bags to return home to Michigan after spending four months interning at the progressive think tank, Center for American Progress, in Washington D.C.

She wrote her thoughts on benefitting from affirmative action, for the Communist Party USA's People's World;[3]

In my political science and philosophy courses, the topic of affirmative action is almost always addressed by professors and graduate student instructors. In one class in particular, Law and Philosophy, the rather touchy subject became even more difficult to discuss when my class was placed in small groups to discuss Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger. While it would have been easy to sit back in my chair and remain quiet and let my white peers share their feelings about the university's history of affirmative action cases, I knew I could not let the class period go by without sharing the feelings I often harbored inside in fear of being labeled the "token" black advocate. I spoke in a matter-of-fact tone as I began to share my opinion on the issue; however, I knew my voice alone would not be a catalyst for change..
My experiences of being a black student at Michigan, working at CAP, and being raised in a blended family that is politically-involved in progressive movements, has taught me valuable lessons I will carry with me my entire life. One of the greatest is that when faced with adversity, it is imperative to understand all sides of an issue, regardless of your personal position on it. I have been particularly inspired by the U of M's Black Student Union for they have worked to tackle an issue impeding many students with courage, grace, and humility.

References