Sarah Anderson

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Sarah Anderson


Sarah Anderson is a fellow for the Global Economy project at the Institute for Policy Studies. Her current work includes research, writing, and networking on issues related to the impact of international trade, finance, and investment policies on inequality, sustainability, and human rights. Sarah Anderson is "also a well-known expert on executive compensation, as the lead author of 16 annual “Executive Excess” reports that have received extensive media coverage."[1]

Education

Anderson holds a Masters in International Affairs from The American University and a BA in Journalism from Northwestern University.[2]

Career

In 2000,sarah Anderson served on the staff of the bipartisan International Financial Institutions Advisory Commission (“Meltzer Commission”), commissioned by the U.S. Congress to evaluate the World Bank and IMF. Sarah is also a board member of Jubilee USA Network and a co-author of the books Field Guide to the Global Economy (New Press, 2nd edition, 2005) and Alternatives to Economic Globalization (Berrett-Koehler, 2nd edition, 2004).

Prior to coming to IPS in 1992, Sarah Aberson was a consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development (1989-1992) and an editor for the Deutsche Presse-Agentur (1988). [3]

Advising Obama Administration

In 2009, Anderson served on an advisory committee to the Obama administration on bilateral investment treaties.[4]

Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award

Community leaders from El Salvador received the 2009 Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award on behalf of the National Roundtable on Mining. This "broad coalition of environmental, faith-based, and community activists has successfully worked to block permits for potentially environmentally devastating mining in El Salvador".

The coalition will speak about the investor-state suits recently filed under the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) by U.S. and Canadian mining companies against El Salvador. They will also discuss their work to oppose mining, and the attacks and threats that they and other members of the National Roundtable have suffered in El Salvador.

Speakers at the event:

  • Representatives of El Salvador’s National Roundtable on Mining: William Castillo, Center for Research on Investment and Trade (CEICOM); Francisco Pineda, Environment Coordinating Committee of Cabañas
  • Sarah Anderson, Global Economy Project Director at the Institute for Policy Studies. Anderson reported on her recent experience serving on an official advisory committee to the Obama administration on bilateral investment treaties (BITs). The administration is currently reviewing the U.S. Model BIT, which includes rules that are similar to those in the investment chapter of CAFTA and other trade agreements.
  • Rep. Mike Michaud|Michael Michaud, Democratic Congressman from and the lead sponsor of the Trade Reform, Accountability, Development and Employment (TRADE) Act. One provision of the TRADE Act would ensure that trade agreements no longer permit foreign investors to sue governments in international tribunals over domestic regulatory policies that protect public health and the environment.
  • Stephanie Burgos, Oxfam America (moderator)

The event was organized by the Institute for Policy Studies, Oxfam America,and the Washington Office on Latin America, and sponsored by Rep. Michael Michaud (D-ME).[5]

America's Future Now!

Sarah Anderson was one of the 148 speakers who spoke at the 2010 America's Future Now Conference.[6]

Letelier-Moffitt selection panel

The Institute for Policy Studies' 33rd Annual Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Awards, were awarded, Thursday, October 15, 2009.

Members of the selection panel were;[7]

FTT

John Cavanagh, who has served as IPS’s director for fifteen years, is one of the few great masters of progressive coalition-building, providing the glue, vision and boundless energy that has held together many alliances—across international borders and various issues.

Today he and Sarah Anderson continue to be leaders in the fair trade movement and are spearheading the drive for a financial transactions tax. [8]

External links

References