Rubén Hinojosa

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Rubén Hinojosa is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the 15th district of Texas.

Congressional Hispanic Caucus

In 2013 Rubén Hinojosa was Chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Peace Pledge Coalition

In 2007 90 Members of Congress, pledged in an open letter delivered to President Bush: "We will only support appropriating funds for U.S. military operations in Iraq during Fiscal Year 2008 and beyond for the protection and safe redeployment of all our troops out of Iraq before you leave office." The letter was initiated by the Peace Pledge Coalition. The Coalition was led by Tim Carpenter, Progressive Democrats of America, Bob Fertik, Democrats.com Medea Benjamin, CodePink, Bill Fletcher, co-founder of Center for Labor Renewal David Swanson, AfterDowningStreet.org, Democrats.com, Progressive Democrats of America, Kevin Zeese, Voters for Peace, Democracy Rising, Brad Friedman, co-founder of Velvet Revolution, Bill Moyer, Backbone Campaign.

Rubén Hinojosa signed the letter.[1][2]

"Go back to Mexico"

A U.S. congressman told a group of students here that tea party protesters in Washington, D.C., had urged he and a colleague to "go back to Mexico."

Rep. Ruben Hinojosa gave a talk at the University of Texas-Pan American on October 18 2010, when he brought the story to light. A reporter from the Rio Grande Guardian picked up the story. The Texas AFL-CIO sent it out to all the state's union activists.

Hinojosa said, as he and Rep. Silvestre Reyes made their way to the House of Representatives, there was a tea party rally against major health and higher education legislation. Five tea party members stopped them and asked if they were congressmen. When they replied "yes" and that they were from Texas, the five white men shouted, "Why don't you go back to Mexico?"

The Rio Grande Guardian reporter wrote, "The audience gasped!" after hearing the story.

It was widely reported in March that tea party protesters accosted congressmen with racist and anti-gay epithets as the House convened to vote on the health care and education reform legislation.[3]

Washington immigration rally

The Cesar E. Chavez Legacy and Educational Foundation took over the US capital Friday afternoon September 14, 2012. They were joined by Congressmembers Lloyd Doggett, Gene Green, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee, Ruben Hinojosa and Congresswoman Judy Chu from Califormia, who met with the Latino activist, Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, SEIU, AFSCME, civil and human immigrant rights activist from all over the country.

Jaime Martinez, organizer of the events, along with Dr. Eduardo Ibarra, from Puerto Rico, President of El Colegio de Dotores, and chairman of the board of a national organization, “Viva El Pueblo Latino.” Ask both political parties to work together for a just pathway to citizenship and to support the students “Dreamers” in their efforts to obtain equality in their education.

Democatic represntaive Ruben Hinojosa said that these immigrants have already shown that they are the future of the country. “They are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every single way except on paper”.[4]

ARA endorsement, 2012

The Alliance for Retired Americans endorsed Rubén Hinojosa in 2012.[5]

ARA PAF endorsement, 2014

The Alliance for Retired Americans Political Action Fund endorsed Rubén Hinojosa in 2014.[6]

Condemning Criticism of Islam legislation

On December 17, 2015, Rep. Don Beyer, Jr. introduced legislation condemning "violence, bigotry, and hateful rhetoric towards Muslims in the United States." The legislation is based on unsourced claims that there is a "rise of hateful and anti-Muslim speech, violence, and cultural ignorance," and a "disproportionate targeting" of "Muslim women who wear hijabs, headscarves, or other religious articles of clothing...because of their religious clothing, articles, or observances." The resolution, H.Res.569 - Condemning violence, bigotry, and hateful rhetoric towards Muslims in the United States [7]

The legislation was cosponsored by Rep. Michael Honda, Rep. Keith Ellison, Rep. Joseph Crowley, Rep. Andre Carson, Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Rep. Betty McCollum, Rep. Marcy Kaptur, Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Rep. Dan Kildee, Rep. Loretta Sanchez, Rep. Charles Rangel, Rep. Scott Peters, Rep. Brad Ashford, Rep. Alan Grayson, Rep. Mark Takai, Rep. Brian Higgins, Rep. William Keating, Rep. Raul Grijalva, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Rep. G.K. Butterfield, Rep. Gerry Connolly, Rep. Ruben Gallego, Rep. Cheri Bustos, Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Kathy Castor, Rep. Luis Gutierrez, Rep. Michael Quigley, Rep. Elizabeth Esty, Rep. Joseph Kennedy III, Rep. Robin Kelly, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, Rep. Gregory Meeks, Rep. Grace Meng, Rep. Al Green, Rep. Katherine Clark, Rep. Adam Schiff, Rep. Alcee Hastings, Rep. Sam Farr, Rep. Frank Pallone, Rep. Jim McDermott, Rep. Barbara Lee, Rep. Donna Edwards, Rep. Robert Brady, Rep. Frederica Wilson, Rep. Michael Doyle, Rep. Albio Sires, Rep. Suzan DelBene, Rep. Judy Chu, Rep. Jared Polis, Rep. David Loebsack, Rep. Bill Pascrell, Rep. Debbie Dingell, Rep. Jan Schakowsky, Rep. Steve Cohen, Rep. Ruben Hinojosa, Rep. John Yarmuth, Rep. Niki Tsongas, Rep. Jim Langevin, Rep. Mark Pocan, Rep. John Conyers, Jr., Rep. Mark Takano, Rep. Tim Ryan, Rep. Jose Serrano, Rep. Hank Johnson, Rep. Paul Tonko, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, Rep. Lois Capps, Rep. David Price, Rep. Doris Matsui, Rep. Gwen Moore, Rep. Denny Heck, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Rep. John Carney, Rep. Xavier Becerra, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Rep. John B. Larson, Rep. Dina Titus, Rep. Peter Welch, Rep. Lloyd Doggett, Rep. Jim Himes, Rep. Matt Cartwright.

External links

References