Gerald Horne

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Gerald Horne


Gerald Horne is a U.S. writer, historian and activist.

Affirmative Action Coordinating Center

The AACC was formed in 1979 as a joint project of the National Lawyers Guild, National Conference of Black Lawyers and the Center for Constitutional Rights. Director Gerald Horne was aided by CCR director Marilyn Clement, lawyers Randolph H. McLaughlin and Doris Peterson, and legal worker Claudette Furlonge who serve as AACC board members and advisers.[1]

"Solidarity"

Circa 1984, July 17, at the Great Electronic Underground, San Francisco, Democratic Socialists of America's American Solidarity Movement organized a reception "Solidarity"at the Democratic Party Convention, in support of US labor.

Sponsors included Gerald Horne, National Conference of Black Lawyers.[2]

Guardian ad, May 25, 1988, p. 9, National Day of Protest to End Israeli Occupation

A full-page ad appeared in the weekly Marxist-Maoist U.S. publication, the Guardian on May 25, 1988, page. 9 under the there of "National Day of Protest to End Israeli Occupation", calling on people to "Demonstrate" Saturday, June 4, 1988". Its themes were:

  • Stop the Killing, Beating, Imprisonment, and Expulsion of Palestinians
  • End the Israeli Occupation of the West Bank and Gaza
  • Stop U.S. Funding of the Occupation

Demonstrations were scheduled for New York City, Chicago, Houston and San Francisco.

Endorsers included Gerald Horne, counsel, Local 1199, Hospital Workers Union.

Black Studies

In 1989 Gerald Horne was Chairman of the Black Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Addressed Communist Party USA, front meeting

An ad/notice was placed in the Guardian, November 8, 1989, concerning an upcoming U.S. Peace Council national conference. The text of the notice was:

"End The Cold War Fund Human Needs" U.S. Peace Council's Tenth Anniversary National Conference - Boston, Mass., Nov. 10-12, 1989

Speakers Included:[3]

Socialist Scholars Conference 1990

The Socialist Scholars Conference 1990, held September 6-8, at the Hotel Commodore, New York, included panels such as:[4]

The Impact of Changes in Eastern Europe on the Economics and Political Movements in Africa and Latin America

  • Archie Singham, Political Science, CUNY Graduate Center
  • Gerald Horne, Black Studies, University of California SB
  • Tim Hector, Chair, Antigua Caribbean Liberation Movement

Socialist Scholars Conference

Sam Anderson, New School for Social Research; Abdul Alkalimat, Barbara Omalade, Center for Worker Education; Bill Sales, Gerald Horne, Horace Campbell, Jimmy Garrett, Muhammad Ahmad, Ron Bailey, Jim Turner and Mack Jones were speakers on the Curriculum of Inclusion or... Curriculum of Struggle? panel sponsored by the Antiracist Curriculum Collaborative and the Network of Black Organizations at the Tenth Annual Socialist Scholars Conference. The conference was held April 24-26, 1992 at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, New York City[5]

Conference on Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the 90s

The Conference on Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the 90s was the Committees of Correspondence's first national conference held in Berkeley, California July 17-19, 1992.[6]

Workshops that were held at the conference on Saturday, July 18 included:[7]

Globalization What are the implications for labor and the left of the scientific and technological revolution and globalization of capital and labor?

Black Radical Congress

In March 1998 “Endorsers of the Call” to found a Black Radical Congress (BRC) included Gerald Horne, Professor of African-American Studies, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill[8].

Horne was a participant in the BRC Workshop Sessions, June 19-21, 1998, held at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and was listed as a Co-coordinator for the workshop entitled "Global Issues Are Black issues: Framing Our Struggle as International and Anti-Imperialist"[9].


600 Local Activists Reclaim Dr. King's Radical Legacy

According to Will Jones, a graduate student at UNC and an activist with the Carolina Socialist Forum, Internationalist Books, and the North Carolina chapter of the Committees of Correspondence.

Chapel Hill - Six hundred people came out Monday, January 20, 1998 for a march and rally in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King's dedication to radical social change. The Chapel Hill/Carrboro NAACP, in coalition with more than thirty other organizations, organized this year's march to mark recent gains by the UNC Housekeepers Association and the Chapel Hill/Carrboro Black Public Works Association. According to long-time Chapel Hill activist Joe Straley, this was the largest such event the town had ever seen.

The size of the march reflected two months of dedicated coalition work. The NAACP, the BPWA, and the HKA worked with the Carolina Socialist Forum, the Coalition for Economic Justice, the Lesbian Avengers, the Feminist Alliance and other groups to build a coalition to plan the celebration. Organizers sent over 800 letters and flyers asking community and work place organizations, churches, and campus groups to spread the word and to join the march. They spoke before congregations, on the radio, and local cable access television, and passed out thousands of flyers advertising the event.

The day before the march, Carolina Socialist Forum began the celebration with a panel discussion entitled Civil Rights for the 1990s: A Call for Economic Justice. Dr. Gerald Horne, director of the Black Cultural Center, began the forum with an historical view of the relationship between racism and economic exploitation in the United States. Lesbian feminist activist Mab Segrest followed by pointing out the need for a global perspective on social inequality in the present period. Lizbeth Melendez, who is helping Guatemalan poultry workers organize a union in Morganton NC, concluded with a local view of the relationship between racial justice and the union movement. All three speakers stressed the centrality of economic justice in civil rights struggles for people of color, women, lesbians, gays, bi-sexuals, and other targets of discrimination.

Martin Luther King Day began with a rally on the steps of the Chapel Hill post office. Dave Lippman warmed up the crowd with songs, and the Internationalist Bookstore displayed a selection of books on Dr. King and the civil rights movement. As the crowd grew from 50 to 75 to 150 people, Hank Anderson of the NAACP called them closer for a series of speeches.

Speakers included Joe Straley, John Herrera, Gerald Horne, and other Chapel Hill activists. Alley Murphey brought greetings from the Housekeepers Association at Eastern Carolina University, and Chris Smith of the UNC Housekeepers read a poem. By the time Ange-Marie Hancock of the Feminist Alliance and the Coalition for Economic Justice introduced the chants for the march, the crowd had grown to 400.[10]

Nature, Society and Thought

In the late 2000s, Gerald Horne (African American studies, Univ. of Houston) was an assistant editor of University of Minnesota based Marxist journal Nature, Society and Thought[11];.

"Socialism Betrayed"

SocB.PNG

In 2004 Roger Keeran, and Thomas Kenny published "Socialism Betrayed: Behind the Collapse of the Soviet Union"

Special thanks went to Bahman Azad, Norman Markowitz, Michael Parenti, Anthony Coughlan, and Betty Smith for reading the entire manuscript and suggesting editorial and substantive changes. We would also like to thank those who read all or parts of the manuscript and those who shared their ideas and sometimes their encouragement: Gerald Horne, Frank Goldsmith, Erwin Marquit, Sam Webb, Elena Mora, Mark Rosenzweig, Gerald Meyer, Joe Sims, Lee Dlugin, Pat Barile, Daniel Rubin, Phillip Bonosky, Bill Davis, Evelina Alarcon, Tim Wheeler, Scott Marshall, Noel Rabinowitz, Paul Mishler, Jarvis Tyner, Esther Moroze, Marilyn Bechtel, Gerald Erickson, Constance Pohl, Jackie DiSalvo, Richard Najarian and Brawee Najarian, and Jim Miller.

Also thanked were librarians, Mark Rosenzweig of the Reference Center for Marxist Studies and Jackie Lavalle, for helping with the research, and Eileen Jamison for tracking down numerous books and articles. Also owed a debt of gratitude were Gregory Grossman for helping find sources on the second economy. Also thanked were SUNY Empire State College for granting a sabbatical leave to Roger Keeran during which he did some early research and writing. Catherine Keeran for her assistance and Alice Ward and John Ward for providing accommodations and company, while Roger did research at the University of Texas. David Granville, Derek Kotz, Ian Denning and Charles Keller, and for technical help.[12]

MDS Board member

Original members of the 2006 Movement for a Democratic Society board included[13];

Elliott Adams, Senia Barragan (Student Representative), David Barsamian, Noam Chomsky, Carl Davidson, Bernardine Dohrn, Bill Fletcher Jr, Bert Garskof, David Graeber, Tom Hayden, Gerald Horne, Mike James, Robin D G Kelley, Mike Klonsky, Ethelbert Miller, Charlene Mitchell, Michael Rossman, Mark Rudd, Howard Zinn.

On February 17, 2007, the Movement for a Democratic Society held a well attended conference[14]at New York City’s New School University.

The business portion of the meeting followed with each board nominee introducing themselves to the conference. The board, a very diverse group, was voted in by acclamation... Board nominees where were not able to attend the conference were included in the appointment by acclamation. The list included Elliott Adams, Panama Vicente Alba, Tariq Ali, Stanley Aronowitz, David Barsamian, Rosalyn Baxandall, John Bracey, Jr., John Brittain, Robb Burlage, Noam Chomsky, Jayne Cortez, Carl Davidson, Angela Davis, Bernardine Dohrn, Barbara Epstein, Gustavo Esteva, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Stephen Fleischman, Bill Fletcher Jr, Tom Hayden, Gerald Horne, Florence Howe, Mike James, Robin D G Kelley, Alice Kessler Harris, Rashid Khalidi, Mike Klonsky, Betita Martinez, Ethelbert Miller, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Barbara Ransby, Patricia Rose, Michael Rossman, Studs Terkel, Charlene Teters, Jerry Tucker, Immanuel Wallerstein, Cornel West, Leonard Weinglass and Howard Zinn.

Free Mumia Abu-Jamal

In 2008 Gerald Horne, Professor, University of Houston, Houston, TX signed a statement circulated by the Partisan Defense Committee calling for the release of convicted “cop-killer” Mumia Abu-Jamal.[15]

Communist Party connections

In 2009 Gerald Horne was a contributing editor and a member of the [16] of the Editorial Collective of Political Affairs, theoretical journal of the Communist Party USA. He is also listed as a sponsor[17] of the Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library in Oakland California.

Political Affairs

In 2015 Gerald Horne served on the editorial board of the Communist Party USA's Political Affairs. [18]

Science & Society

In 2009, the Editorial Board of Science & Society, a New York based "journal of Marxist Thought and Analysis", consisted of:[19];

2010 Chicago NAARPR awards

Democratic Socialists of America member Timuel Black received the Human Rights Award from the Chicago branch of the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression, on Saturday, April 17, 2010 at their annual Dinner. The organization also honored Charlene Mitchell, Mark Clements, and Bernardine Dohrn. Professor Gerald Horne was the keynote speaker.[20]

Communist Party speaker

Speak Progress is the speakers bureau of the Communist Party USA. Listed speakers, as of October 2014, included Gerald Horne[21]

Gerald Horne holds the John J. and Rebecca Moores Chair of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston. His most recent books are: Black Revolutionary: William Patterson and the Globalization of the African American Freedom Struggle and Negro Comrades of the Crown: African Americans and the British Empire Fight the U.S. Before Emancipation.

Dr. Horne received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley and his B.A. from Princeton University.
Other books written by Dr. Horne: Race to Revolution: The U.S. and Cuba during Slavery and Jim Crow ; Fighting in Paradise: Labor Unions, Racism and Communists in the Making of Modern Hawaii ; W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography ; Race Woman: The Lives of Shirley Graham Du Bois ; The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten.

References

  1. Information Digest, August 8,1980 page 267
  2. American Solidarity Movement flyer]
  3. Guardian, November 8, 1989
  4. Second Annual Socialist Scholars Conference program.
  5. SSE Tenth Annual Conference Program, 1992
  6. Conference program
  7. Proceedings of the Committees of Correspondence Conference: Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the '90s booklet, printed by CoC in NY, Sept. 1992 (Price: $4)
  8. http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/45a/524.html
  9. The Black Scholar: The Black Radical Congress: 1988, Fall/Winter, 1988, Volume 28, No. 3/4, Page 45
  10. The Prism, 600 Local Activists Reclaim Dr. King's Radical Legacy by Will Jones
  11. http://homepages.spa.umn.edu/~marquit/nst20n3-4a.pdf
  12. "Socialism Betrayed: Behind the Collapse of the Soviet Union"
  13. file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/Local%20Settings/Temporary%20Internet%20Files/Content.Outlook/TWRF0IYM/discuss%20%282%29.htm
  14. http://antiauthoritarian.net/NLN/?p=179
  15. Signers of Campaign to Free Mumia Abu-Jamal, Now
  16. http://www.politicalaffairs.net/article/static/17/1/3/,,
  17. http://www.marxistlibr.org/sponsors.html
  18. PA About, accessed October 2015
  19. http://www.scienceandsociety.com/history.html
  20. New Ground, 128, Jan./Feb. 2010
  21. Speak Progress, Speakers page