Allie Cohn

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Allie Cohn


Allie Cohn is a Knoxville Tennessee activist.

NPC candidate

In August 2017 Allie Cohn stood for election to the Democratic Socialists of America National Political Committee, at the National Convention in Chicago, from Knoxville Democratic Socialists of America.[1]

I was born and raised in Atlanta, GA and have lived in 9 different states since graduating from high school. I am a southerner at heart and was glad to make my way back after living in the Northeast, Midwest and Southwest regions.
I have spent the last 12 years teaching students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Pre-K through 12th grade in a variety of settings. I am also a mom to 3 sons, ages 10, 16 and 17.
I was introduced to DSA a year ago when I moved to Knoxville, TN. I had just returned from the DNC, where I proudly served as a national delegate for Bernie Sanders. The Knoxville Chapter invited me to come and share my experience with the Sanders campaign. It felt like coming home when I walked through those doors!
I am so excited to be running on the Praxis team along with Ravi Ahmad, Leslie Driskill, Celeste Earley, Zac Echola, Michael Patterson and R.L. Stephens!
I serve on the Knoxville-area DSA Executive Committee. I am also on the Executive Committee for the Knox County Democratic Party where I am also chair of the KCDP Progressive Action Committee.
I was involved in organizing and sustaining a weekly #NoDAPL solidarity circle that lasted 20 weeks. We sent supplies to the protest in Standing Rock. We also organized divestment actions at our local SunTrust bank branches. We walked to every SunTrust in Knoxville to recruit people to pull their money. I am currently involved in educating our community about the outsourcing and privatization that will affect 10,000 Tennessean facilities workers. Our local DSA chapter has been diligently writing letters to the editor and supporting actions with our local unions.
I have been able to pull other members of the local Democratic Party into DSA because it is not a political party. Our influence has been growing locally. We need a base. If we don’t have one, then we can’t pressure politicians to enforce any legislative changes we win. But we have to be open to new people and new ideas.[2]

2017-2017 DSA NPC members

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Members elected to the Democratic Socialists of America National Political Committee, August 2017;

References